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Highlighting UD’s Role in Global Education,
UD Center Organizes International Oceans Conference in Vietnam

The Gerard J. Mangone Center for Marine Policy at the University of Delaware organized the Fourth Global Conference on Oceans, Coasts, and Islands: Advancing Ecosystem Management and Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management by 2010 in the Context of Climate Change, which took place April 7-11, 2008 in Hanoi, Vietnam. The conference was hosted by the Vietnamese government at the highest policy level and assessed essential issues in the governance of the world’s oceans, with a focus on moving toward an ecosystem-based and integrated approach to oceans governance at national, regional, and global levels. For the first time, a concerted effort was made to bring oceans policy together with climate change issues, which, as indicated in the 2007 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change will have profound effects on ecosystems and coastal populations around the world, especially among the poorest people on Earth and in small island developing States.

Coinciding with President Harker’s vision for the university becoming a major force in global education, the Center reached out to the Government of Vietnam as an emerging leader in South East Asia that could provide a vision for the region on issues related to oceans and coasts. All totaled, the conference was successful in bringing together a cross-sector of international experts from different background, bringing together 439 participants from 71 countries from around the world, representing a variety of entities including government agencies, intergovernmental organizations, nongovernmental organizations, media, and the business and industry community.

The University of Delaware was well-represented at the conference-- 23 present and past members of the university community participated actively in the Hanoi conference, including:
    University Faculty: Biliana Cicin-Sain, Willett Kempton, and Gerard J. Mangone (CEOE), and Stephanie McClellan (Urban Affairs)

    Current Center staff and Center graduate students: Miriam Balgos, Shelby Hockenberry, Caitlin Snyder, Isabel Torres de Noronha, and Katya Wowk

    Current Center undergrads: M. Katherine Brown and Kathleen McCole

    Current senior Center fellows: Qinhua Fang (Xiamen University, China), Gi-Jun Han (MOMAF, Korea), and Dong Sung Kim (KORDI, Korea)

    Center Alumni: Stefano Belfiore (IOC/UNESCO), Gonzalo Cid (NOAA), Giselle Firme (Nature Conservation Council of New South Wales, Australia), Ampai Harakunarak (Thailand Environment Institute); Indu Hewawasam (World Bank), and Rebecca Metzner (FAO)

    Past Fellows: Salvatore Arico (UNESCO), Rudolf Dorah (Solomon Islands), and LaVerne Walker (St. Lucia)
The conference focused especially on assessing the progress that has been achieved (or lack thereof) on the global oceans targets established by the world’s political leaders at the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development: Achieving ecosystem-based and integrated ocean and coastal management by 2010, reducing marine biodiversity loss by 2010, establishing networks of marine protected areas by 2012, restoring fishery stocks by 2015, among others.

The climate issues that ocean and coastal leaders around the world will need to face will ineradicably change the nature of ocean and coastal management, introducing increased uncertainty, the need to incorporate climate change planning into all existing management processes, the need to develop and apply new tools related to vulnerability assessment, and the need to make difficult choices in what in many cases will be “no win” situations, involving adverse impacts to vulnerable ecosystems and communities. Conference participants underlined that we must begin this process now, including altering coastal development that is already in the pipeline--we don’t have the luxury of waiting 10 years before we consider the implications and before we act.

The Global Forum, the World Ocean Network, and the World Ocean Observatory have created a special GOC2008 website and YouTube channel designed specifically to inform audiences across the world about the context and work of the Global Forum using rich media at http://www.thew2o.net/goc2008 as well as a GOC2008 YouTube Channel at http://www.youtube.com/globaloceans2008. Here, visitors can explore the proceedings of the Conference and each major ocean issue being addressed, view the reports, recommendations, and Policy Briefs of the Global Forum’s 12 Working Groups (involving 250 experts from 68 countries) which have provided recommendations on priority next steps that the international community should take on major ocean issues. Visitors can also see short video interviews and podcasts of ocean and coastal experts from various sectors around the globe as well as the presentations and movie clips illustrating major ocean issues.

In addition, the International Institute for Sustainable Development – Reporting Services provided daily coverage of conference proceedings. As the publisher of the Earth Negotiations Bulletin, IISD Reporting Services is recognized for its objectivity and issue expertise in the field of international environment and sustainable development policy. In past Global Ocean Conferences, IISDRS has helped the Global Forum to disseminate conference reports containing recommendations on advancing the development of integrated oceans policies worldwide to their mail lists which include 45,000 subscribers. Visitors can view the conference coverage from the ENB site at http://www.iisd.ca/ymb/sdoh4/.

For further information about the conference or the Global Forum as well as to express interest in participating in the continuing work of the Global Forum, please contact The Gerard J. Mangone Center for Marine Policy at 302-831-8086.
Biliana Cicin-Sain receives the
Elisabeth-Mann-Borgese Meerespreis ("Prize of the Sea")

Biliana Cicin-Sain, director of the Gerard J. Mangone Center for Marine Policy and Professor of Marine Policy at the University of Delaware’s College of Earth and Marine Studies, has been awarded the Elisabeth-Mann-Borgese Meerespreis (“Prize of the Sea”) by the Ministry of Science, Economics and Transport of the Land Schleswig-Holstein in Germany.

The prize is awarded to prominent personalities that advocate the protection and preservation of the sea in politics and society. In 2006, the first time it was given, Professor Klaus Topfer, former director of the United Nations (U.N.) Environment Programme and German Minister for the Environment, received the prize.

The Meerepreis is named after Elisabeth Mann-Borgese, known as “the Mother of the Oceans.” The daughter of noted German writer Thomas Mann, Professor Borgese worked incessantly to promote integrated management of oceans as the “common heritage of mankind” and to build the capacity of developing nations to manage their ocean resources. She had a major impact on the U.N. Convention on Law of the Sea and was the founder of the International Ocean Institute, with 25 teaching centers around the world.

The Meerespreis Jury cited Cicin-Sain’s “political and scientific engagement for an ecosystem-based integrated management of the oceans [which] has been instrumental in promoting a responsible and sustainable use of marine environment within the international public.”

Cicin-Sain will accept the Honorary Prize 2007 in Berlin on November 26, 2007, from Schleswig-Holstein’s Minister-President Peter Harry Carstensen. Following this award ceremony, another celebration of the award will take place on November 27 at the Blue Planet Forum in Brussels, organized by the European Committee of the Regions and the Directorate-General for Fisheries and Maritime Affairs of the European Commission.

Cicin-Sain received her doctoral degree in political science from UCLA and completed postdoctoral training at Harvard University. In addition to her roles as director of the Gerard J. Mangone Center for Marine Policy and professor of Marine Policy at the University of Delaware’s College of Earth and Marine Studies, she is editor-in-chief of the international journal Ocean & Coastal Management. She is also a professor in the Department of Political Science and International Relations and in the School of Urban Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Delaware. She is a leader in the field of integrated coastal and ocean governance, both in the United States and around the world, and has forged international collaboration among all sectors of the international oceans community to advance the global oceans agenda.

Cicin-Sain is the organizer, co-chair and head of secretariat of the Global Forum on Oceans, Coasts, and Islands, initially mobilized in 2001 to place issues related to oceans, coasts and island states on the agenda of the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development and to agree on a detailed set of global ocean targets and timelines. Since 2001, the Global Forum has brought together ocean leaders from governments, nongovernmental organizations, U.N. agencies, the private sector and scientific associations from 93 countries to promote the implementation of international ocean agreements, analyze emerging policy issues and advance international consensus on unresolved ocean issues.

Cicin-Sain has served or is serving as a policy advisor to: international organizations — UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, World Bank, U.N. Environment Programme, Inter-American Development Bank; national governments — Albania, Canada, Colombia, Ecuador, Indonesia, R.O. Korea, United States, Vietnam; and U.S. coastal states and counties. Since 1991, she has frequently participated in U.N. negotiations on oceans and coasts, including the 1992 Earth Summit, the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development, and annual U.N. negotiations on oceans. Among her advisory appointments, she has served on various boards of the U.S. National Research Council (National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering), including the Marine Board and the Ocean Studies Board and on the Department of Interior’s Scientific Committee on the Outer Continental Shelf. Her experience also includes work as a senior policy advisor in the International Program Office of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); a scientific advisor to the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy; an advisor to the Independent Oceans Commission, Portugal; an advisor to the Ocean Policy Research Foundation in Japan; on the Academic Committee of Xiamen University in China; and a visiting professor of Marine Policy at the United Nations University-Institute of Advanced Study in Tokyo.

Cicin-Sain is the author of over 100 publications in marine policy, with an emphasis on crosscutting issues related to integrated ocean and coastal governance. Her 1998 book, “Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management: Concepts and Practices,” has been used in academic and governmental training efforts around the world. Her 2000 book, “The Future of U.S. Ocean Policy: Choices for the New Century,” presented a blueprint for national ocean policy reform in the United States. “Integrated National and Regional Ocean Policies: Comparative Practices and Future Prospects” (forthcoming in 2008) brings together in-depth analyses of the experiences of 15 nations and 4 regions of the world that have taken concrete steps toward crosscutting integrated oceans governance and provides international guidance on emerging best practices in the development and implementation of national and regional ocean policies.

In 2002, Cicin-Sain received the Ocean and Coastal Stewardship Award at the California and the World Ocean Conference (given to Robert W. Knecht and Biliana Cicin-Sain for “…their inspirational vision, leadership, integrity, and scholarship: A proud legacy in defense of the world’s oceans and coasts to benefit current and future generations”). In 2007, she was awarded the Coastal Zone Management Award by the Coastal Zone Foundation, in recognition of her exemplary contributions to the advancement and application of the scientific and related technical and professional knowledge necessary for management, protection, and use of coastal and ocean resources. The Foundation noted that “in Dr. Cicin-Sain’s distinguished careers as a teacher, researcher, advisor, and coastal advocate, she has consistently encouraged and applied the integration of science and policy for coastal management. She is an internationally recognized leader in integrated coastal and ocean governance and has forged many international collaborations among all sectors of the global oceans community.”

Earlier in her career, Cicin-Sain served in two U.S. federal agencies — NOAA and the Department of Housing and Urban Development — was a professor of political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB); founded and directed UCSB’s Ocean and Coastal Policy Center; and served as a researcher at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, and at the East-West Center in Hawaii.

Professor Cicin-Sain was born in Italy and spent her early years in Argentina, prior to immigrating to the United States. She speaks English, Spanish, and French fluently, as well as some Italian, Serbo-Croatian, Russian, and Portuguese.

Fourth Global Conference on Oceans, Coasts, and Islands set April 7-11, 2008 in Hanoi, Vietnam
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The Fourth Global Conference on Oceans, Coasts, and Islands: Advancing Ecosystem Management and Integrated Coastal and Ocean Management by 2010 in the Context of Climate Change will take place April 7-11, 2008 in Hanoi, Vietnam. The Conference will mobilize high-level policy attention, topical working groups, analytical papers, and other contributions to provide a review of progress achieved (or lack thereof) in advancing ecosystem management and integrated coastal and ocean management by 2010 at national and regional (transboundary) levels, and in the 64% of the ocean beyond national jurisdiction, and on the allied goals of reducing marine biodiversity loss by 2010 and of establishing networks of marine protected areas by 2012 (goals adopted by the world's political leaders at the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development). These goals are considered in the context of climate change, which, as indicated in the 2007 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), will have profound effects on ecosystems and coastal populations around the world.


For more information on the Conference, please visit the Conference web site at:
http://www.globaloceans.org/content/global-conference-2008
Two New Reports Released from the Global Forum on Oceans, Coasts, and Islands
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Meeting the Commitments on Oceans, Coasts, and Small Island Developing States Made at the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development: How Well Are We Doing? provides a "bottom line" on the progress made (or lack thereof) and obstacles faced in the implementation of the oceans, coasts, and SIDS targets of the World Summit on Sustainable Development, the Millennium Development Goals, and other related agreements. Progress has been slow, but there are many promising developments. In some areas, such as integrated coastal and ocean management, ecosystem-based management, GPA, protection of marine diversity, and integrated water resources management, some very tangible progress is being made, often with specific efforts underway in a growing number of countries. In other areas, such as fisheries and global marine assessment, the progress has been slower, but the groundwork seems to have been established for enhanced progress in the next phase.

On Small Island Developing States and oceans, while the Mauritius International Strategy has been adopted, its implementation is in doubt if financial resources and institutional capacity are not enhanced. As the custodians of large areas of the world's oceans, SIDS need assistance and collaboration from the international community to enhance their capacity to delimit, manage, and enforce these areas. The least progress appears to be in meeting the Millennium Development Goals, so essential to human welfare. In this regard, it is imperative that, increasingly, ocean and coastal management programs centrally address poverty reduction goals.

A companion publication, Reports from the Third Global Conference on Oceans, Coasts, and Islands: Moving the Global Oceans Agenda Forward, presents highlights from the Conference as well as summaries of discussions and recommendations on next steps towards meeting the WSSD commitments and the Millennium Development Goals.


Both reports are available electronically on the Global Forum web site :
   1. First Report
   2. Second Report

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Recommendations for an Operational Framework for Offshore Aquaculture in U.S. Federal Waters Released

Biliana Cicin-Sain, director of the University of Delaware's Gerard J. Mangone Center for Marine Policy, recently led an interdisciplinary team of experts from across the United States in developing a detailed set of recommendations to overcome current regulatory gaps and deficiencies. The policy study was funded by the National Sea Grant College Program in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Department of Commerce.

The team's 118-page report, Recommendations for an Operational Framework for Offshore Aquaculture in U.S. Federal Waters, provides guiding principles and specific provisions for the leasing and permitting of aquaculture facilities, site planning and assessment, potential environmental ramifications and steps for mitigating them, and proposed monitoring strategies for facilities raising native fish, shellfish, and seaweeds. The authors note that the question of management of non-native species is set aside for future debate and analysis. The report is available on-line as a free download from Delaware Sea Grant's Aquaculture Resource Center website at:

http://darc.cms.udel.edu/sgeez/sgeez2final.pdf




Third Global Conference on Oceans, Coasts, and Islands

The Global Conference on Oceans, Coasts and Islands: Moving the Global Oceans Agenda Forward convened January 23-28, 2006 at UNESCO headquarters in Paris, France. The Conference mobilized high-level policy attention, topical working groups, analytical papers and other contributions to provide a review of progress achieved and obstacles faced in the implementation of international targets on oceans, coasts, and small island developing States (SIDS), especially those related to the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD), the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and other related agreements such as the Convention on Biological Diversity and Agenda 21.

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The conference was attended by over 400 participants from 78 countries, and brought together members of governments, regional organizations, UN agencies, academia, non- governmental organizations, donor agencies, and industry representatives.

Visit the conference website at:
http://www.globaloceans.org/content/global-conference-2006



TOPS 2005: The Ocean Policy Summit

TOPS 2005: The Ocean Policy Summit: International Conference on Integrated Ocean Policy: National and Regional Experiences, Prospects, and Emerging Practices was held October 10-14, 2005 in Lisbon, Portugal. TOPS 2005 brought together key national level officials, regional organizations, UN agencies, scholars specializing in national ocean policy, donors, nongovernmental organizations, and industry to examine the growing experience around the world with the formulation and implementation of integrated ocean policies at national and regional levels, with the intent of drawing lessons and suggesting emerging best practices.

The 218 participants represented 53 countries, and brought together members of governments, regional organizations, UN agencies, academia, non- governmental organizations, donor agencies, and industry representatives.

Visit the conference website at:

http://www.globaloceans.org/content/ocean-policy-summit-2005



Gerard J. Mangone Center for Marine Policy
301 Robinson Hall, University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19716 USA
Phone: 1-302-831-8086; Fax: 1-302-831-3668